Reblog/Post: “How To Write Better Stories: Action”

Chapter 9, 10 & 11 of Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets teaches us a lot about great storytelling – and I was no J.K. Rowling fan when this started!   Chapter 9 Chapter 8 ends …[read more by clicking the link]

Source: How To Write Better Stories: Action

Surprise! Romance stories need action too. Action isn’t necessarily  about a fight or an epic battle. Action is tension. In romance novels the action comes from interpersonal conflict more than anything else. This doesn’t mean the action can or should only come from the couple because plenty of stories put couples in a greater situation. A lot of people in Hollywood say “Throw a romance story line in for the girls” as though that wins the female population over. No throw in a romance riddled with enchanting story telling. A story focusing on a couple facing the mob or the Machiavellian plots of their rivals who want to tear them apart adds outside forces that test a couple. It isn’t just about having obstacles, which is a mistake a lot of romance novels make. It is about having action that comes from how the characters react, and tension due to what the characters want v.s what they do v.s what the situation/others allow.

Action and conflict is what engages the readers emotional core and intellectual curiosity. Your story ,if done well, should make a reader ask “What is going to happen?” and if you make it clear what’s going to happen “How is it going to happen?” Through exposition you lead a path of crumbs to the greater actions that solidify your story. The action moments are those where your readers are gripping the pages of their book or the corners of their tablet with a mixture of hope and dread. Those moments remind your readers the stakes of your story whether it is through a couple’s fight or through an epic chase seen.

One word of warning, don’t use action scenes as a hook because you think your book needs a burst of excitement. There are times you need to add more scenes and more story for your writing to be interesting. However, adding a traditional action scene for the hell of it is usually pointless. One of the classic mistakes of teenage writers is mistaking drama for a story. I know because I did this in every love story I wrote as a teen…which is why only a handful were ever finished. You put dramatic event after dramatic event without real tension being established because it is “exciting”. OR ,and this is a crime so many authors commit, they dump a chase scene or a fight scene at the beginning of the book as a hook. The rest of the novel may be about a vet nursing a horse back to health, but it begins with an irrelevant chase scene or fight because ACTION! However, throwing a scene in doesn’t just improve your work or hook your reader because eventually they realize that the scenes are just there for the hell of it. Even if they like your story, they’ll probably put it down or roll their eyes into the next dimension. Why? Because the action is insincere to the story being told. Action is a necessary component to any commercial story, but it must come naturally from the storyteller.

Every story has action in some form or some way. How that action unfolds is the question. By keeping in mind the overall theme in your story, the character’s conflicts(both internal and external), and by building tension to make action feel natural you will enhance your story. I promise you by remembering to include action it will help move your writing forward.

Good luck and good writing!

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